To help consumers make the right seafood choice, there are a number of labels/logos to watch out for.


Labels

Below are the labels/logos most commonly found in Hong Kong. These labels/logos indicate that a seafood product has been verified as sustainable by an independent certification body, or declared as sustainable by an organization.

They may not be the only ones you see, so if you come across others, please let us know. Bear in mind that not all the labels are equal, the standards behind the labels differ in their requirements and the nature of verification, so please check online and make sure you are satisfied.

All the labels are developed privately and don’t necessarily follow any national labelling standards, although several follow the Food and Agriculture Organisation or ISEAL (the global membership association for sustainability standards) or other labelling standards. Please click Learn More below and see what it looks like on a seafood product.

Third-party labels

These labels mean that the seafood has been certified as sustainable by an independent body and conforms to a standard set of certification requirements. These requirements, however, may differ according to the standard.


MSC and ASC

Are considered to be the gold standard and should be your first choice if you want to be sure your seafood is sustainable.

Learn more

wild caught


farmed

farmed and freshwater

farmed

wild caught and farmed

Third-party labels

These labels mean that the seafood has been certified as sustainable by an independent body and conforms to a standard set of certification requirements. These requirements, however, may differ according to the standard.


MSC and ASC

Are considered to be the gold standard and should be your first choice if you want to be sure your seafood is sustainable.

Learn more

wild caught


farmed

farmed and freshwater


farmed

farmed and freshwater

Self-declared labels

Mean that the seafood is deemed to be sustainable based on an organization’s own specifications/criteria and assessments.

Learn more
 

Additional labels

You may also come across the following labels, however we were unable to determine the criteria against which the products are judged to be sustainable.

 
 

 Get the WWF Sustainable Seafood Guide

 Definitions

The farming of aquatic organisms such as fish, crustaceans, molluscs and plants, under controlled conditions either in salt or freshwater.
Mass of living organisms in a given area at a given time, e.g. in a salmon fishery, the salmon biomass could be the total weight of the salmon if taken out of the water.
Branch of aquaculture which takes place only in saltwater. Generally the conditions are less controlled being located in the sea. Nonfood products such as fish meal and pearls are often cultivated in mariculture.
The amount of fish that can be taken by a fishery that does not exhaust the fish resources. That is, it leaves sufficient stock for a healthy reproductive population. If the fish taken can be replaced by stock annually – the fishery is considered sustainable in terms of supply.
Fishes and marine wildlife that are caught unintentionally while fishing for a particular (target) species, it may also include undersized/juvenile target species. In Asia, bycatch (often referred to as trash fish) is often used in animal feed and fish meal. In Europe and North America it is often discarded and wasted.
Catch per unit effort (CPUE) is the measure of how much time and effort is put into catching a set amount of fish e.g. tonne of fish. When CPUE falls, it may indicate a decline in a fish population.
Meaning dolphins have not been harmed as bycatch when fishing for the tuna. It does not, however, mean that the fish is sustainable.
This fishing method used to catch tuna is considered the most sustainable as it relies on simply using a pole and line that hooks fish one by one. This means that it only catches the targeted fish, so no other marine life is harmed and numbers taken will be smaller compared to industrial operations.
A fishery is a unit determined by an authority or other entity that is engaged in raising and/or harvesting fish. Typically, the unit is defined in terms of some or all of the following: people involved, species or type of fish, area of water or seabed, method of fishing, class of boat and purpose of the activities.
Stocks fished at or close to the maximum sustainable yield (MSY). No room for further expansion in catch, effective management is require to sustain the MSY.
Seafood that has been captured or farmed in a way that minimises harm to the environment and where the population of the target species is not being overfished. The seafood thus comes from a well-managed fishery or farm so that our oceans remain healthy, fish and shellfish populations thrive and will be available for generations to come.
The rate of fishing exceeds the rate at which the fish stocks can reproduce and as a result, the abundance becomes too low to reach maximum sustainable yield (MSY). No potential for expansion and a high risk of future stock depletion/collapse.
Stocks fished within biologically sustainable levels that have a biomass considerably above the MSY level. May have some potential to increase production.
When fish stocks of larger predatory species are so depleted that smaller species become more abundant (fewer predators). These are then targeted until their stocks are depleted too, and the cycle continues until there is nothing left.
Fish – One or more of the same species. Fishes – At least two of different species.

Where to
eat


Click here

Seafood labels


Click here

Where to
buy


Click here

Online
Stores


Click here

WWF Seafood Pocket Guide

Please obtain your copy here

WWF Seafood Guidebook

Please obtain your copy here

Three questions to ask when using your seafood guide:

  • What species is it?
  • Where is it from?
  • How was it caught, or was it farmed?

Get Updates

WWF Seafood Pocket Guide

Please obtain your copy here

WWF Seafood Guidebook

Please obtain your copy here

Three questions to ask when using your seafood guide:

  • What species is it?
  • Where is it from?
  • How was it caught, or was it farmed?

Get Updates